Discovering the Mysteries of Prehistory through Visual Texts: Cave Paintings, the Peterborough Petroglyphs, and Writing on Stone Provincial Park in Alberta

Mr. Steel

 

Basic rules for entering the cave:

 

1. Inner peacefulness: Maintain a sense of quietude. Prehistoric caves were places to cultivate reverence and a state of contemplative peace. Voices should be used only in hushed tones and whispers. Inappropriate, foolish, or offensive language and conversations will not be tolerated within the cave. Anyone who cannot maintain a sense of decorum or whose actions destroy the contemplative atmosphere of the cave will be asked to leave and sit in detention with administration at the office.

 

2. Outer peacefulness: Respect the physical integrity of the cave environment. Realize that the cave we have constructed has some delicate features. Treat the materials for this experiment with respect. Be aware of not only your voice level, the respectfulness of your language, and your state of mind, but also of your body and the environment within the boundaries of this experiment. Anyone who destroys the physical features and contents of the cave or engages in boisterous behaviour within the cave environment will be asked to leave and sit in detention with administration at the office.

 

3. Listen to the noises that are part of the cave environment. Pay attention to the way that light and shadow play/figure/dance during this experimental experience.

 

4. When contributing to art within the cave, be respectful of the drawings, paintings, impressions, and markings made by other students. Remember: youíre a member of a pre-literate society! No writing is allowed on the cavern walls (only in your journal/workbooks): pictographs only!

 

5. When using our paints, brushes, charcoal, straws, sponges, and water, always be careful that you donít bump into others or mark up their clothing in the darkness of the cave. Be aware of your surroundings and the whereabouts of your classmates.

 

6. Having used the cave materials for your own artistic contributions, put them back where they belong in respectful order when you are done with them.